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Monthly Archives: February 2014

Few posts make it to more than one blog I have, but this one does.

Eyagee's Blog

Inspired by this post by Opinionated Man, I thought I’d do a counter-compliment to his post.

10 Things Koreans should not say to Foreigners

  1. Are you American? Dude, not all white people are from the USA.
  2. (Speaking to a non-white person from Canada) Do you feel left out in your country? Seriously, learn what the term Ethnic groups means and read a website.  Geeze, we know you know how to use the Internet!
  3. How old are you? None of your damn business.  Older than you, so you already know to use the formal style of Hangul, so use it already.
  4. Are you married? None of your business.  Learn the term ‘personal boundaries’ and look up how that applies to non-Koreans why don’t you?!
  5. (My wife got this one) Teacher, you are sexy! WTF, do you really don’t know how to behave around adults? Why don’t we have a conversation with your…

View original post 153 more words

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Simple tool:  I found I needed a way to keep tabs on when a DNS changed happened.  Knowing that the current site is hosted on a CloudFlare setup, I found that using curl to read the header, it gave me the server type.  Well, all I needed to know when that server type changed and I can go ahead with the rest of my setup.  This simple bash script works well for it’s basic purpose.

  1. while [ 1 ]; do
  2.         curl -Is  > test-curl.log
  3.         date >> test-curl-results.log
  4.         head -2 test-curl.log | tail -1 >> test-curl-results.log
  5.         notify-send “$(grep Server: test-curl.log | cut -c9-)”
  6.      sleep 1m
  7. done

When I see the change, I simply just stop the script from running.  If the change happens while I’m sleeping, I can see when it officially changes over.  If you have use for it, then enjoy it!

*currently set to 1m for testing.  Change to suit.

Been awhile since I posted here, figured this would be a good one to keep people aware, knowing how popular these routers were.

Researchers say they have uncovered an ongoing attack that infects home and small-office wireless routers from Linksys with self-replicating malware, most likely by exploiting a code-execution vulnerability in the device firmware.

Johannes B. Ullrich, CTO of the Sans Institute, told Ars he has been able to confirm that the malicious worm has infected around 1,000 Linksys E1000, E1200, and E2400 routers, although the actual number of hijacked devices worldwide could be much higher. A blog post Sans published shortly after this article was posted expanded the range of vulnerable models to virtually the entire Linksys E product line. Once a device is compromised, it scans the Internet for other vulnerable devices to infect.

Read More here.